服务时间:早上9点到晚上8点

010-52928288

您的位置:官网首页>焦点新闻> Sat阅读:格林斯潘回忆录txt

Sat阅读:格林斯潘回忆录txt

2014-11-04 10:43:11 来源: 时代焦点 打印 字号:| |

  每一篇SAT阅读素材均有其主要观点或中心主题。典型的围绕文章主要观点的问题大多是:在这篇文章中作者的主要目的是什么?这篇文章主要涉及什么问题?这篇文章主要建议是什么?这篇文章总体上想要回答什么问题等。读完每一篇SAT阅读素材,我们都要针对SAT素材想想这几个问题。

  Fed chairmen had ventured behind the iron curtain before—both Arthur Burns and William Miller had come to Moscow during the period of detente in the 1970s—but I knew they'd never had a conversation like this one. In those years, there had been little to discuss: the ideological and political divide between the centrally planned economies of the Soviet bloc and the market economies of the West was simply too vast. Yet the late 1980s had brought astonishing changes, most obviously in East Germany and other satellites, but also in the Soviet Union itself. Just that spring, Poland had held its first free elections, and the ensuing events had amazed the world. First the Solidarity union won decisively against the Communist Party, and then, instead of sending in the Red Army to reassert control, Gorbachev declared that the USSR accepted the outcome of a free election. More recently East Germany had started to dissolve—tens of thousands of its people took advantage of the state's weakening hold to emigrate illegally to the West. And just days before I arrived in Moscow, Hungary's Communist Party renounced Marxism in favor of democratic socialism.

  The Soviet Union itself was obviously in crisis. The collapse of oil prices a few years before had eliminated its only real source of growth, and now there was nothing to offset the stagnation and corruption that had become epidemic during the Brezhnev era. Compounding this was the cold war, whose pressure was greatly increased by America's huge arms buildup under President Reagan. Not only was the Soviet Union's grip on its satellites slipping, but also it was having trouble feeding its population: only by importing millions of tons of grain from the West was it able to keep bread on the shelves. Inflation, Abalkin's immediate concern, was indeed out of control—I'd seen with my own eyes long lines outside jewelry stores, where customers desperate to convert rubles into goods with lasting value reportedly were being restricted to one purchase per visit.

  Gorbachev, of course, was moving as rapidly as he could to liberalize the system and reverse the decay. The general secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union struck me as an extraordinarily intelligent and open man, but he was of two minds. Intelligence and openness were his problems, in a way. They made it impossible for him to ignore the contradictions and lies the system presented him with day in and day out. Though he'd grown up under Stalin and Khrushchev, he could see that his country was stagnating and why, which unraveled his indoctrination.

  The big mystery to me was why Yuri Andropov, the hard-liner who preceded Gorbachev, had brought him forward. Gorbachev didn't bring down the Soviet Union purposely, yet he did not raise his hand to prevent its dissolution. Unlike his predecessors, he did not send troops into East Germany or Poland when they moved toward democracy. And Gorbachev was calling for his country to become a major player in world trade; without question he understood this was implicitly procapitalist, even if he didn't understand the mechanics of stock markets or other Western economic systems.

  My visit dovetailed with Washington's growing effort to encourage reform-minded Soviets under Gorbachev's openness policy, glasnost. As soon as the KGB allowed people to attend evening gatherings, for instance, the U.S. embassy instituted a series of seminars at which historians, economists, and scientists could attend lectures by their Western counterparts on previously forbidden subjects such as black markets, ecological problems in the southern republics, and the history of the Stalin era.

  A large part of my itinerary consisted of meetings with high officials. Each surprised me in some way. While I'd studied free-market economics for much of my life, encountering the alternative and seeing it in crisis forced me to think more deeply than I ever had before about the fundamentals of capitalism and how it differed from a centrally planned system. My first inkling of this difference had come during the drive into Moscow from the airport. In a field beside the roadway, I'd spotted a 1920s steam tractor, a clattering, unwieldy machine with great metal wheels. "Why do you suppose they still use that?" I asked the security man who was with me in the car. "I don't know," he said. "Because it still works?" Like the 1957 Chevrolets on the streets of Havana, it embodied a key difference between a centrally planned society and a capitalist one: here there was no creative destruction, no impetus to build better tools.

  No wonder centrally planned economic systems have great difficulty in raising standards of living and creating wealth. Production and distribution are determined by specific instructions from the planning agencies to the factories, indicating from whom and in what quantities they should receive raw materials and services, what they should produce, and to whom they should distribute their output. The workforce is assumed to be fully employed, and wages are predetermined. Missing is the ultimate consumer, who in a centrally planned economy is assumed to passively accept the goods planning agencies order produced. Even in the USSR, consumers didn't behave that way. Without an effective market to coordinate supply with consumer demand, the consequences are typically huge surpluses of goods that no one wants, and huge shortages of products that people do want but that are not produced in adequate quantities. The shortages lead to rationing, or to its famous Moscow equivalent—the endless waiting in line at stores. (Soviet reformer Yegor Gaidar, reflecting on the power of being a dispenser of scarce goods, later said, "To be a seller in a department store was the same as being a millionaire in Silicon Valley. It was status, it was influence, it was respect.")

  SAT阅读考题重点考察考生的美国大学教材的快速阅读能力、理解能力及判断能力。小编为大家整理的关于格林斯潘回忆录的SAT阅读素材的详细内容,希望对大家有所帮助,过河小编祝大家都能取得理想的SAT阅读考试成绩!

编辑推荐:

Sat阅读:精读与泛读

提高sat阅读速度

sat阅读分数表换算介绍

时代焦点热报课程

  • 推荐课程
  • 近期开班
  • 暑假课程
  • 北美课程
课程名称 课时 费用 招生方案 在线咨询
SAT暑假阅读真经班 20h ¥5800 课程详情 立即咨询
SAT暑假强化班 78h ¥10800 课程详情 立即咨询
ACT 面授1对1课程 点击查看 点击查看 课程详情 立即咨询
托福(保分、机经)VIP1对1 点击查看 点击查看 课程详情 立即咨询
GRE精品班 50h 1980元/人 课程详情 立即咨询
课程名称 课时 费用 招生方案 在线咨询
SAT暑假阅读真经班  20h  ¥5800.0 课程详情 立即咨询
AP面授1对1课程 点击查看 点击查看 课程详情 立即咨询
课程名称 课时 费用 招生方案 在线咨询
美国中学语文全日制班  48h  ¥9800 课程详情 立即咨询
美国中学语文暑假班 48h ¥9800 课程详情 立即咨询

时代焦点网获得DCM数百万美元风投

DCM投资的其它公司

业界评价

许轶是教育培训和留学领域的绝对专家,我强烈看好时代焦点的社会价值和商业价值。

——老虎资产管理公司(Tiger Management)主管合伙人
Alex Robertson

斯坦福商学院的校训是:“改变生活、改变组织、改变世界。”许轶是我们的优秀学生。

——原斯坦福商学院院长 Robert Joss博士

许轶和时代焦点教育所做的教育事业前途无量,我们很高兴并愿意资助这样优秀和有梦想的创业者。

——DCM基金全球合伙人卢蓉

许轶是我的好朋友也是我很欣赏、有理想的年轻人。优秀的人做优秀的事,一定有大发展!

——美国上市公司晶科太阳能(纽交所代码:JKS)首席财务官
张龙根

媒体报道

许老师和股神巴菲特
许老师和股神巴菲特
许老师和百度创始人李彦宏
许老师和百度创始人李彦宏
许老师和从0到1的作者Peter Thiel
许老师和从0到1的作者Peter Thiel
许老师和老虎基金合伙人
许老师和老虎基金合伙人
许老师和斯坦福商学院院长
许老师和斯坦福商学院院长

服务时间:早上9点到晚上8点 010-52928288

北京地址:北京市海淀区北三环西路64号 (北京理工大学北门东10米院内)

上海:联系人 闫老师 电话 18635586819 地址:上海市静安区南京西路555号555大厦605室

广东:联系人 徐老师 电话 13401198086 地址:广州市天河区林和西路9号耀中广场B座32层10号

郑州:联系人 王老师 电话 13810970107 地址:郑州市高新区翠竹街863软件园11号楼13层1306

沈阳:联系人 刘老师 电话 15998864887 地址:沈阳市皇姑区黄河南大街68号甲府兴苑 1单元1601

北京时代焦点国际教育咨询有限责任公司 www.focusedu.cn

Copyright@2010-2016 Focus Education.All Rights Reserved.京ICP备11025628号

友情链接  --
去美国读高中
去美国读高中
去美国读本科
去美国读本科
去美国读本科
去美国读研究生